Technology Back to Blog

Welcome to Technology

21 minuteminutos readde lectura
Rafael Ríos
ByPor Rafael Ríos

63

Since its creation in 1986, the Carlos Slim Foundation has pushed access to technology Mexico for millions of Mexicans across the nation, as part of a wider inclusion strategy for those in need. In Mexico City, there are numerous spaces that strive to achieve this purpose; and in the Historic District, close to the Zócalo, we find one of them. The TelmexHub, inaugurated in 2010, features capacity for 300 users, of which 150 have ethernet connection. The fleet of machines available to borrow includes laptops with different operating systems (Windows y Linux), iPads, and Mac Pros. The computers also feature design software (AutocadRhino3dMaxMayaAdobe Suite); and if that weren’t enough, all of the services are free– a token for paying your telephone bill on time.  

Bicentennial Digital Library 

This novelty service allows free borrowing of computers, just like traditional libraries offer with books. However, here, there’s a different focus: silence isn’t obligatory, although using headphones is recommended (and nearly a part of modern tech protocol). One of the library’s features worth noting is its 10 Gb/s connection speed. 

A Coworking Space

The TelmexHub offers space, furniture, and equipment to organize meetings, talks, video conferences, and other events related to the newest technological trends– by this means, fulfilling one of its primary objectives. It’s available to nearly anyone who needs it, and who envisions an event or initiative in this space. I noticed that there are kids’ classes and a video game room, which allows many young people to practice their favorite affinity. It may even carry these teens to forge a pixel-filled future with entertainment and juicy winnings, like we have recently seen in the news

Incubator and Camp  

The Hub, further, organizes its own regular events. It was the host of iWeekend, an intense and innovative experience that brought together a diverse crew of talented entrepreneurs and professionals to present ideas and collaborate to bring them to fruition. They developed a business plan, prototype, and product presentation, all in a weekend. It will be interesting to keep track of these entrepreneurs, who have apparently taken advantage of technology Mexico to develop their ambitions into the near future. The center also organizes what it calls KodeCamp, a 4-day event of intensive sessions in which assistants learn to construct and edit a dynamic webpage. By the end of the camp, they will have gained skills in programming and algorithms, and will have started to create dynamic projects in the role of a software developer. 

Building CDMX 

Saturday, July 20th, at noon, I parked my bike in front of a telephone booth (not seeing any designated bike parking on the corner of Venustiano Carranza and Isabel la Católica, in the Historic District). I went into the Telmex Technology and Education Center– the official name of the TelmexHub– and, after a digital registration process, I gained access to an event organized by the well-known global software company, Microsoft. I could then verify how this place achieves one of its goals, accessing both in-person audiences and streaming to many followers throughout and beyond Mexico. The event that I attended was called Building CDMX— the most important of the year, which speaks of all the updates within the Microsoft ecosystem. The event was dedicated to showing off the newest advances of artificial intelligence, web and mobile development, cloud computing, and information platforms, drawing just over 40 attendees that listened and could put into practice these publically-shared updates and features (since one of this space’s amenities is precisely lending high-speed internet laptops). 

Languages 

I noticed that everything linked with technology Mexico is written and pronounced in English, independent of the predominance that this language otherwise has across Spanish-speaking countries like Mexico.  And when I mentioned, in English, the event that I was attending, to the policeman standing at the entrance (the main host to any Mexican office or public space), he doubted for a few seconds before confirming. He re-pronounced the name “Mexican style,” and gave me some directions. Therefore, in a way, the first path and filter to access technology seems to be through language. Those who don’t understand it are left automatically excluded; and those with initial access will be disqualified if they fail to understand references to programs and tools. Although, on the other hand, we must accept that “exoticising” or contextually translating computational-language terms will lead to misunderstandings and astronomical ridicule. I can just imagine new generations struggling with someone who asks about “vajilla suave” (“software”), or “labor de armazón” (“framework”), or “conexión a su red interna” (“internal network connection”).  

Surrounded by Programmers

These types of events in places like the TelmexHub, the Digital Cultural Center (Digital Cookie), the Spanish Cultural Center, the Rule (which we will review in forthcoming articles), and more bring together interesting personalities from Mexico’s entire technological panorama. Those individuals who I got to see in action were: Jesús Gil, Humberto Jaimes, Roberto Cervantes, and Amin Espinoza, introduced by Samantha Villareal. What’s interesting about these guys is their casual attitude– cool, some would say– in which their dress code seems to likewise reveal their programming code. They expressed themselves naturally and skillfully about programs, platforms, and digital tools, as if they were speaking of any day-to-day topic. They were totally apolitical, beyond dogmas and irrational beliefs, and full of references typical to the Mexican humor in which double-meaning permeates everything. 

All exclusive

It’s evident that the tech sector is male-dominant. At this event, in addition to the female M.C., I counted 3 women in the audience. This is interesting, considering the particular technological landscape: three years ago, the space began aiming for gender inclusion through specific events. Something else I discovered while milling through programmers and web developers was the tremendous generational discrimination that is applied in the technological universe. It’s painful that many pick on age in spite of experience. We should accept that expert programmers– that is, with 20 years of industry experience– are baby boomers. And, living among millennials or even xennials, they shut down when reacting to basic questions about programming languages that they’ve seen evolve and improve since their creation and public release. In this sense, WebCreek sets an example by viewing its team members’ generational and cultural gaps as an advantage, rather than an obstacle, in the best functioning of the company’s daily tasks.  

Pizza Hub and Conclusion

When the eating hour was drawing near at the Building CDMX, after having attended three lectures, my stomach demanded attention. It continued until a pause was followed by the undeniable scent enclosed in cardboard boxes, and my complaints were deterred: “beggars can’t be choosers.” We all went invited to grab a slice from the well-known pizza franchise. While we gobbled down our lunch in a space that blanketed us under colonial buildings adjacent to the Telmex, I delivered this mental sentence:

“Technology is anonymous, just like electricity. It flows wherever, without discrimination of who uses it or how: from a hairdryer to a blender used for a delicious sauce. It passes from an operation table to an individual residence, where a video game console is in use. We’re all one in the digital world.” 

So, finishing up my two slices (of course, I came out the freeloader), I undertook a graceful escape. But not without being asked to exit the Hub the same way that I entered: through an on-line registration.  

So now you know, dear readers, that the TelmexHub of Isabel la Católica street is available for you. Whether you’re strolling through the Center and need to use a computer or get online, or if your dreams are big and need technology and wide spaces, this place can help you more than you imagine. 

Bicentennial Digital Library 

This novelty service allows free borrowing of computers, just like traditional libraries offer with books. However, here, there’s a different focus: silence isn’t obligatory, although using headphones is recommended (and nearly a part of modern tech protocol). One of the library’s features worth noting is its 10 Gb/s connection speed. 

A Coworking Space

The TelmexHub offers space, furniture, and equipment to organize meetings, talks, video conferences, and other events related to the newest technological trends– by this means, fulfilling one of its primary objectives. It’s available to nearly anyone who needs it, and who envisions an event or initiative in this space. I noticed that there are kids’ classes and a video game room, which allows many young people to practice their favorite affinity. It may even carry these teens to forge a pixel-filled future with entertainment and juicy winnings, like we have recently seen in the news

Incubator and Camp  

The Hub, further, organizes its own regular events. It was the host of iWeekend, an intense and innovative experience that brought together a diverse crew of talented entrepreneurs and professionals to present ideas and collaborate to bring them to fruition. They developed a business plan, prototype, and product presentation, all in a weekend. It will be interesting to keep track of these entrepreneurs, who have apparently taken advantage of technology to develop their ambitions into the near future. The center also organizes what it calls KodeCamp, a 4-day event of intensive sessions in which assistants learn to construct and edit a dynamic webpage. By the end of the camp, they will have gained skills in programming and algorithms, and will have started to create dynamic projects in the role of a software developer. 

Building CDMX 

Saturday, July 20th, at noon, I parked my bike in front of a telephone booth (not seeing any designated bike parking on the corner of Venustiano Carranza and Isabel la Católica, in the Historic District). I went into the Telmex Technology and Education Center– the official name of the TelmexHub– and, after a digital registration process, I gained access to an event organized by the well-known global software company, Microsoft. I could then verify how this place achieves one of its goals, accessing both in-person audiences and streaming to many followers throughout and beyond Mexico. The event that I attended was called Building CDMX— the most important of the year, which speaks of all the updates within the Microsoft ecosystem. The event was dedicated to showing off the newest advances of artificial intelligence, web and mobile development, cloud computing, and information platforms, drawing just over 40 attendees that listened and could put into practice these publically-shared updates and features (since one of this space’s amenities is precisely lending high-speed internet laptops). 

Languages 

I noticed that everything linked with technology is written and pronounced in English, independent of the predominance that this language otherwise has across Spanish-speaking countries like Mexico.  And when I mentioned, in English, the event that I was attending, to the policeman standing at the entrance (the main host to any Mexican office or public space), he doubted for a few seconds before confirming. He re-pronounced the name “Mexican style,” and gave me some directions. Therefore, in a way, the first path and filter to access technology seems to be through language. Those who don’t understand it are left automatically excluded; and those with initial access will be disqualified if they fail to understand references to programs and tools. Although, on the other hand, we must accept that “exoticising” or contextually translating computational-language terms will lead to misunderstandings and astronomical ridicule. I can just imagine new generations struggling with someone who asks about “vajilla suave” (“software”), or “labor de armazón” (“framework”), or “conexión a su red interna” (“internal network connection”).  

Surrounded by Programmers

These types of events in places like the TelmexHub, the Digital Cultural Center (Digital Cookie), the Spanish Cultural Center, the Rule (which we will review in forthcoming articles), and more bring together interesting personalities from Mexico’s entire technological panorama. Those individuals who I got to see in action were: Jesús Gil, Humberto Jaimes, Roberto Cervantes, and Amin Espinoza, introduced by Samantha Villareal. What’s interesting about these guys is their casual attitude– cool, some would say– in which their dress code seems to likewise reveal their programming code. They expressed themselves naturally and skillfully about programs, platforms, and digital tools, as if they were speaking of any day-to-day topic. They were totally apolitical, beyond dogmas and irrational beliefs, and full of references typical to the Mexican humor in which double-meaning permeates everything. 

All exclusive

It’s evident that the tech sector is male-dominant. At this event, in addition to the female M.C., I counted 3 women in the audience. This is interesting, considering the particular technological landscape: three years ago, the space began aiming for gender inclusion through specific events. Something else I discovered while milling through programmers and web developers was the tremendous generational discrimination that is applied in the technological universe. It’s painful that many pick on age in spite of experience. We should accept that expert programmers– that is, with 20 years of industry experience– are baby boomers. And, living among millennials or even xennials, they shut down when reacting to basic questions about programming languages that they’ve seen evolve and improve since their creation and public release. In this sense, WebCreek sets an example by viewing its team members’ generational and cultural gaps as an advantage, rather than an obstacle, in the best functioning of the company’s daily tasks.  

Pizza Hub and Conclusion

When the eating hour was drawing near inside the Building CDMX, after having attended three lectures, my stomach demanded attention. It continued until a pause was followed by the undeniable scent enclosed in cardboard boxes, and my complaints were deterred: “beggars can’t be choosers.” We all went invited to grab a slice from the well-known pizza franchise. While we gobbled down our lunch in a space that blanketed us under colonial buildings adjacent to the Telmex, I delivered this mental sentence:

“Technology is anonymous, just like electricity. It flows wherever without discrimination of who uses it or how: from a hairdryer to a blender used for a delicious sauce. It passes from an operation table to an individual residence, where a video game console is in use. We’re all one in the digital world.” 

So, finishing up my two slices (of course, I came out the freeloader), I undertook a graceful escape. But not without being asked to exit the Hub the same way that I entered: through on-line registration.  

So now you know, dear readers, that the TelmexHub of Isabel la Católica street is available for you. Whether you’re strolling through the Center and need to use a computer or get online, or if your dreams are big and need technology and wide spaces, this place can help you more than you imagine.